Scarlet Ibis

Scarlet Ibis

Common Name: Scarlet Ibis
Scientific Name: Eudocimus ruber
Exhibit: Aviary
Medium: Colored Pencil
Date finished: August 28, 2010
Observation: The Scarlet Ibis is a very popular bird in the aviary due to their bright coloration and larger size compared to most of the other bird in there. Though it might also be that my favorite place to sit in the aviary is right around where they like to hang out. One thing that stands out to me is the pronunciations that the visitors use. I've heard so many variations of ways to say the name. The correct way is 'I-bis' with a long first 'i'. The most common mispronunciation is when people say 'i-bis' with a short first 'i'. Others I've heard are 'Li-bis', 'Libs', 'a-bis' (Like 'abyss'), 'ee-bees', and some more less obvious versions. As for the picture itself I had managed to catch the Ibis, who I now know as 95, just as he took off from a close overhead branch. That photo was taken just before Christmas 2009, and despite how few colors I actually used compared to most of my other pictures, this one still took quite a while due to drawing almost every feather individually. For most of the feathers I would keep piling on colors as the shading grew darker. Almost the whole Ibis has a base color of Light Peach (Prismacolor). Then I would add Blush Pink, Pink, Carmine Red, and then Scarlet Lake as needed. If I need to go even darker, then I would switch from the reds over to the warm greys. Though over all of those colors I also have a top color which is Salmon Pink. That color gives it more of an orangish tint. Even the black feathers have the Light Peach base color. Since this picture took quite a while to draw, I was spending quite a bit of time also observing the Ibises themselves. One thing I noticed was that they look different during breeding season than they do during the winter. I drew their winter plumage. When ready to breed the Scarlet Ibises change almost everything. Their feathers become darker yet brighter, their pinkish beak becomes black, and their pink legs become red. To anyone not paying attention the change is not very noticeable, but since I was drawing the Ibis and had the reference to their winter plumage, I could see a definite difference.